Children and Grieving: Presentation Reflection

The presentation as a whole went over very well. Our slides were informative, the sources were reputable, and our manner was professional in accordance with the audience. However, there were a few things that could have been improved upon. At the beginning, rather than just jumping into the recommendations we should have touched upon the behavior of a grieving child. Thus parents would know what to watch out for and tips on how to handle the behavior. It would also have been beneficial to mention the parameters of the conversation (or conversations) so parents would understand how to discuss death with their child. If we had done this we could have continued to connect the specific sources back to this base and explain how each source can aid the conversation. This would have better tied the presentation together in a smoother and neater manner rather than the somewhat jumpy route that we took by introducing different sources without a base. Another way in which we could have added to our presentation would have been to include material in other languages. Overall, we do believe our presentation would have been a more complete success with these changes. While a delicate topic, we believe we handled it with understanding and patience.

Read Aloud Reflection: I Spy with My Little Eye

 

Gibbs, E. (2014). I spy with my little eye. Somerville, MA: Templar Books, an imprint of Candlewick Press.

I am not a public speaker. Any opportunity to speak in front of a large group of people gets me nervous! This was the second time this semester I had to read a children’s book in front of a class and was less nervous. However, my nerves impacted my overall performance as I read the book too quickly. I felt pressure as I knew my classmates were grading me and many of the comments mentioned I rushed through my reading. In the future I will try to be more aware of my pacing, hopefully improving with practice.
Overall, I am glad I choose I Spy With My Little Eye to read. Reading a book with minimal words required creativity with the audience. The words and pictures in the book were large so students could easily read from far away.  My classmates commented that I should have pointed to the words as I read, encouraging students to follow along with me. Before class the professor mentioned that students should sit on the floor as I read the story. I was hesitate at first, but realized this was helpful and it encouraged more eye contact and interaction.
As I was considering the book, I had trouble placing the age group, but was satisfied with my decision. Parents and children as young as two years old, can enjoy reading a fun, interactive book, and playing a guessing game together.
I appreciate the class feedback and was happy that many of the students liked the introduction as I explained the game and provided an example, modeling the activity before I began. Being enthusiastic about the material, reading at a slower pace, and having more interactions with the class were suggested. Next time I have a chance to read a children book I will try to read with more inflection in my voice. With practice, I will over come my fear of public speaking, becoming more confident.
Though I had some issues such as pacing, reading and interacting with the “children,” this exercise was helpful and I enjoyed reading to the class. I stepped outside my comfort zone and the honest class feedback was appreciated!

Importance of Intellectual Freedom in Children’s Librarianship

Intellectual freedom is the right of every individual to seek and receive information from all points of view without restrictions. This freedom is the basis for our democratic system and allows citizens to be well informed of any topic. It is important that kids have diverse material options so they can learn to make their own decisions. Encouraging and protecting the free flow of viable information to children and their guardians is vital. The School Library Media Centers and Intellectual Freedom webpage states that, “students’ right to access to information includes the right to develop skills necessary to locate and obtain materials and to examine critically and interpret the information that they find.” Children’s librarians provide the best materials to teach children how to locate accurate and reliable information and become critical thinkers.

A children’s librarian must be prepared for material challenges as children’s materials are often criticized by adults. According to a study done by Jaclyn Lewis Anderson, the youth services director of the Madison County Library system found that it is most often parents challenging materials that they find inappropriate for all children. A children’s librarian needs to explain that while the parent has the right to choose what materials their child has access to, this does not apply to all children within the library system. Often this attempt to ban or censor a material adds interest as shown in a different study conducted on children’s views of censorship by Natasha Isajlovic-Terry and Lynne McKechnie. They found (through interviews) that children understand that some materials are meant for adults, but some children do not believe that their parents or guardians should have total control over their reading materials. It was also understood that if an adult were to view something that they had accessed to be inappropriate and it was banned the child would use their own agency to regain access to the controversial material. Children are intelligent and adults need to recognize their ingenuity to become knowledgeable, the best way to do that is to have access to the right information. Intellectual Freedom is a core value for children’s librarians as a means to provide access to valuable information without restrictions.

 

Annotated Source Recommendations for Librarians:

Asato, N. (2011). The origins of the freedom to read foundation: public librarians’ campaign to  establish a legal defense against library censorship. Public Library Quarterly, 30(4), 286- 306.

This source would be extremely useful for librarians looking to explain library censorship and the library’s censorship protections to library patrons who may be looking to challenge a material they find problematic. A base history of some of the legal cases may also give a librarian more confidence in dealing with this delicate situation.

 

Stauffer, S. (2014) The dangers of unlimited access: fiction, the internet and the social

construction of childhood. Library and Information Science Research, 36(3-4),

154-162.

The internet is a constant issue in the censorship debate, is there such thing as too much internet freedom and if so, how much is too much?  This article addresses both sides of the internet argument, the laws put in place regarding it, and can aid a librarian in creating a plan for their own library in regards to children and the internet.

 

Isajlovic-Terry, N., McKechnie, L. (2012). An exploratory study of children’s views of

censorship. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to       

Children, 10 (1), 38-43.

As mentioned above this article focuses on children’s opinions of censorship and the ways in which they operate regarding censored materials. It’s useful for a children’s librarian to understand their patrons, their needs, and their opinions on materials.

 

Anderson, J. (2014). The classification of censorship: an analysis of challenged books by classification and subject heading. The Journal of the New Members Round Table, 5(1), 1-18.http://www.ala.org/nmrt/sites/ala.org.nmrt/files/content/oversightgroups/comm/schres/endnotesvol5no1/2classificationofcensorship.pdf

Children’s Librarians can refer to the study to get the most frequently challenged subjects and the reader audiences most affected by these challenges. While they are creating their collections they can refer to past book challenges and be wary of future objections to their children’s collection.

 

Intellectual Freedom: Issues and Resources. Retrieved April 18, 2017, from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom

Librarians can get direct information regarding intellectual freedom for the ALA website. If needed they can get direct quotes regarding children’s right, toolkits, guidelines, and more insights to inform the patrons of their rights.

 

Oltmann, S. M. (2016). Public Librarians’ Views on Collection Development and Censorship. Collection Management, 41(1), 23-44. doi:10.1080/01462679.2015.1117998

The study is a valuable resource for librarians, as colleagues were asked about the pressure in developing collections, agreement with intellectual freedom statements and correspondence regarding personal beliefs and intellectual freedom statements. The paper resulted in the overall belief of intellectual freedom being a core value for the profession of librarians.

 

References

Anderson, J.C. (2014). The classification of censorship: an analysis of challenged books by

classification and subject heading. Endnotes, 5(1), 1-18.

Isajlovic-Terry, N., McKechnie, L. (2012). An exploratory study of children’s views of

censorship. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to                                                                                                                      Children, 10 (1), 38-43.

 

Little Mouse Gets Ready

little mouse
                        Smith, J. (2009). Little Mouse gets ready. New York: Toon Books.
                 mouse2mouse 1

Summary: When Little Mouse’s mom tells him to get ready for a field trip to the barn, he begins getting dressed, with a few problems. Will he master all the intricacies of putting on his clothes, from snaps and buttons to Velcro and tail holes, leading to a surprise ending. This book will be great for all readers, easy to read, with fun illustrations and a great sense of humor.

Review: 

Being a little kid and having trouble with putting on clothes is a universal problem. The surprise ending captures a blend of whimsy and practicality storytelling, while the mouse is simply adorable. Smith’s art is as beautiful and fun as always. From the eagerness of Little Mouse’s face as he runs off to get his clothes, to the careful concentration of pulling on a sock, every moment simply explodes in cuteness. Little Mouse Gets Ready is yet another perfect introduction to a lifetime of reading graphic novels.

Appeal: This comic will appeal to young children as the themselves learn to take initiative and learn to put on their own clothes. The storyline is fun and simple as it reinforces relevant concepts to children such as feet and socks. Young readers will enjoy the large font and child friendly illustrations as two or three comic strips grace each page. The story teaches children about putting on clothes while throwing in some humor as mice don’t wear clothes.

Educational Connections:

Clothes and Getting dressed

Taking Initiative

Planning Steps for activities

http://www.toon-books.com/uploads/1/2/5/6/12564774/lmo.cc.lp.as.pdf

Genre: Humor, Fiction
Interest Level: Age 3+
Reading level: K – 2nd
 
Awards:
2009 Theodore Seuss Geisel Honor Book
School Library Journal Best Comics for Kids 2009
Association for Library Service to Children’s Graphic Novels Reading List 2013, 2014,2016
A Junior Library Guild Selection
Featured in School Library Journal’s Best Comics for Kids
Pennsylvania Center for the Book Best Children’s Books for Family Literacy 2010
Read-Alikes:
the bignono
Benny and Penny in The Big No No!
             In this beginner comic book, Benny and his sister Penny are suspicious of their new neighbor and go snooping and uncover a lot about themselves and a new friend. Through many misunderstandings, they learn to apologize and make a new friend. Young children will love the graphic-novel format and the charming illustrations will draw them into the story. It is easy to read and follow scenes with all the illustrations.
Hayes, G. (2015). Benny and Penny in the big no-no!: a Toon book. Minneapolis, MN: Spotlight.
silly lilly
Silly Lilly and The Four Seasons
              Lilly is a little girl who delights in the unexpected surprises of each season, peering inside shells in the summer and tasting different kinds of apples in the fall. Similar to Little mouse, concepts are learned and reinforced in this charming graphic novel. Lilly learns about the outdoors and introduces the youngest readers to the colors, words, and shapes in nature.
Rosenstiehl, A. (2014). Silly Lilly and the four seasons: a Toon book. Somerville, MA: Toon Books.

Digital Media and Apps

Vercelletto, C. (2017). The Digital Wild West of Apps Is an Opportunity for Librarians. School Library Journal. Retrieved April 28, 2017, from http://www.slj.com/2016/02/technology/applications/cooney-study-on-early-literacy-app-market-reveals-sound-advice/

Christina Vercelletto surveyed language and literacy apps targeted to children through various digital app stores for librarians to promote and share with their patrons. The recommended choosing high-quality apps that encourage participation. Librarians need to know what to look for when choosing apps for young children and be ready with resources to help parents and children carefully select digital apps. The article is targeted for children librarians as they select apps for their libraries digital devices and share them with their community through social media. The article does not review one app program, but recommends to libraries how to search for, recommend, promote, and utilize the apps. Librarians trying to choose digital apps face a truly “digital wild west,” with too many options. Librarians could teach parents strategies for getting involved with their children’s app play or connect an app to a library program.

SLJ App Review and The HornBook App Review websites coincides with the article’s views on digital apps. Cindy Wall, a children’s librarian said that, “We must use multiple sources to find quality app titles and quality app reviews to ensure that the apps meets or exceeds the developer description..” The article suggests that finding the best apps can be difficult and to look beyond the best educational apps promoted in app stores. Having professional sites such as School Library Journal promote and review the apps is vital in ensuring that the apps are appropriate for the target audience and fulfills the goals of the program.

The Importance of Intellectual freedom in Children’s Librarianship

Intellectual freedom is the right of every individual to seek and receive information from all points of view without restrictions. This freedom is the basis for our democratic system and allows citizens to be well informed of any topic. It is important that kids have diverse material options so they can learn to make their own decisions. Encouraging and protecting the free flow of viable information to children and their guardians is vital. The School Library Media Centers and Intellectual Freedom webpage states that, “students’ right to access to information includes the right to develop skills necessary to locate and obtain materials and to examine critically and interpret the information that they find.” Children’s librarians provide the best materials to teach children how to locate accurate and reliable information and become critical thinkers.

A children’s librarian must be prepared for material challenges as children’s materials are often criticized by adults. According to a study done by Jaclyn Lewis Anderson, the youth services director of the Madison County Library system found that it is most often parents challenging materials that they find inappropriate for all children. A children’s librarian needs to explain that while the parent has the right to choose what materials their child has access to, this does not apply to all children within the library system. Often this attempt to ban or censor a material adds interest as shown in a different study conducted on children’s views of censorship by Natasha Isajlovic-Terry and Lynne McKechnie. They found (through interviews) that children understand that some materials are meant for adults, but some children do not believe that their parents or guardians should have total control over their reading materials. It was also understood that if an adult were to view something that they had accessed to be inappropriate and it was banned the child would use their own agency to regain access to the controversial material. Children are intelligent and adults need to recognize their ingenuity to become knowledgeable, the best way to do that is to have access to the right information. Intellectual Freedom is a core value for children’s librarians as a means to provide access to valuable information without restrictions.

Annotated Source Recommendations for Librarians:

Asato, N. (2011). The origins of the freedom to read foundation: public librarians’ campaign to  establish a legal defense against library censorship. Public Library Quarterly, 30(4), 286-306.

This source would be extremely useful for librarians looking to explain library censorship and the library’s censorship protections to library patrons who may be looking to challenge a material they find problematic. A base history of some of the legal cases may also give a librarian more confidence in dealing with this delicate situation.

Stauffer, S. (2014) The dangers of unlimited access: fiction, the internet and the social       construction of childhood. Library and Information Science Research, 36(3-4), 154-162.

The internet is a constant issue in the censorship debate, is there such thing as too much internet freedom and if so, how much is too much?  This article addresses both sides of the internet argument, the laws put in place regarding it, and can aid a librarian in creating a plan for their own library in regards to children and the internet.

Isajlovic-Terry, N., McKechnie, L. (2012). An exploratory study of children’s views of            censorship. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to       Children, 10 (1), 38-43.

As mentioned above this article focuses on children’s opinions of censorship and the ways in which they operate regarding censored materials. It’s useful for a children’s librarian to understand their patrons, their needs, and their opinions on materials.

Anderson, J. (2014). The classification of censorship: an analysis of challenged books by classification and subject heading. The Journal of the New Members Round Table, 5(1), 1-18.http://www.ala.org/nmrt/sites/ala.org.nmrt/files/content/oversightgroups/comm/schres/endnotesvol5no1/2classificationofcensorship.pdf

Children’s Librarians can refer to the study to get the most frequently challenged subjects and the reader audiences most affected by these challenges. While they are creating their collections they can refer to past book challenges and be wary of future objections to their children’s collection.

Intellectual Freedom: Issues and Resources. Retrieved April 18, 2017, from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom

Librarians can get direct information regarding intellectual freedom for the ALA website. If needed they can get direct quotes regarding children’s right, toolkits, guidelines, and more insights to inform the patrons of their rights.

Oltmann, S. M. (2016). Public Librarians’ Views on Collection Development and Censorship. Collection Management, 41(1), 23-44. doi:10.1080/01462679.2015.1117998

The study is a valuable resource for librarians, as colleagues were asked about the pressure in developing collections, agreement with intellectual freedom statements and correspondence regarding personal beliefs and intellectual freedom statements. The paper resulted in the overall belief of intellectual freedom being a core value for the profession of librarians.

References

Anderson, J.C. (2014). The classification of censorship: an analysis of challenged books by classification and subject heading. Endnotes, 5(1), 1-18.

Isajlovic-Terry, N., McKechnie, L. (2012). An exploratory study of children’s views of          censorship. Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 10 (1), 38-43.